The Gift of the Present Moment – Art Exhibit at the Arts Center South Florida with Lazaro Amaral and Chloe Firetto-Toomey

It’s been months since I posted anything about the show. I did really well in the beginning but then life happened and I found myself running to the printroom after working double shifts to make these 7 by 3 foot stencils. Fearing cockroach attacks in the darkness as I penciled in the words in the light of the projector.

As a reminder the following phrases that are the premise to our show, they are also the massive stencils I’ve cut and shellac’d til the wee hours.

1.You don’t need eyes to see, you need vision
2. It is what you make of it                                                                                                                          3. Life is a classroom each pupil must learn a lesson                                                                                      4. All we have is NOW                                                                                                                                5. Slow explosions of dreams                                                                                                                       6. Don’t forget to look UP                                                                                                                              7. Handmade Art, heart-heard words, for your eyes.Image

For more photos telling the making of these stencils visit our Facebook page, The Gift of the Present Moment.

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Preparing for the November window instelation with Lazaro Amaral Art

Lazaro Amaral Art & ChloBirdPoetry prepare for their next venture

The Arts Center South Florida, has allocated a window space for well-known artist Lazaro Amaral and his poetic apprentice, Chloe Firetto-Toomey aka Chlobirdpoetry. The Lincoln road window show debuts in November 2012 and they intend to let you see the birthing of their ideas and document the entire process.

 The Concept:

  ‘The Gift of the Present Moment”

 Artist/Poet Vision of Show…

The Arts Center display area has 7 windows. Each window will display a posters that reads seven ‘poetic insights’ on a backdrop of stenciled images.  We came up with this idea/concept while drinking coffee and smoking on Lazaro’s balcony overlooking the palm trees of Miami Beach.

Over the week that followed I came up with three samples of writing for Lazaro to choose one that will be the premise of our show. Below is a page I wrote including the seven insights.

The Poet sought out the Artist and asked, will you teach me how to print? And so he did, and they collaborated to present to you, The Gift of the Moment, 7 posters via 7 windows. Their message is familiar, the teachings unique to experience, and universal to all.

  1. You don’t need eyes to see, you need vision

  2. Life is a classroom, each pupil must learn a lesson

  3. All we have is NOW

  4. Leaves are falling prayer flags

  5. Love your craft

  6. Craft the art of being

  7. Handmade Art, heart-heard words, for your eyes.

Posters will be for sale after the show, to be sold in pairs, singular or, as a set. The display will take place September 26th to November 4th 2012 at The Arts Center South Florida, 924 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach.

  How to Produce our Vision.

Each of the seven phrases must be printed out and made into stencils. We have decided to use the classic stencil font for the text as it’s bold, easy to read, cut out and spray paint. I would have like to consider the typewriter font as it has a classic feel to it but once we print it the words might not be as eligible as when the stencil font is used.

Each phrase is going to need two panels or 7 by 4 feet long pieces of paper.

Panel 1 is going to be the backdrop for the words.

Panel 2 is going to be made into the word stencil.

Panel 1 will be spray painted white.

Panel 2 will be used to stencil the words onto panel 1.  We will do this in black to give a shadow effect to the words.

We will begin by printing out one phrase at a time onto a 4 by 4 inch space. Then, we will place it under a projector so that the words are magnified onto the 7 by 3 feet paper. Then, we trace with a pencil the outline of the words. Then, we shellac it to protect the paper, and with care, use an exacto knife to cut out the words and make stencil. We will keep the loose letter cut outs to possibly use again on the second backdrop panel.

We will then repeat this process until we have all the words in stencil.

How it all began…

A poet and a painter meet to create a body of work through different mediums via a shared view or concept. Artwork is bound to color, words to paper. Lets dive into both… a brief history 1st…

When ChloBirdPoetry walked into Lazaro Amaral’s print room at the South Florida Arts Center, it was as though the horizon spelled the limitless and she wanted to explore it. Chloe was eager to learn, to print her words, Lazaro was eager to teach his skills and did so with passion. Often Chloe in her willingness to learn would make mistakes in haste, turning Lazaro’s face red in frustration before breaking to a smile. Chloe knew this was a beginning, and she told Lazaro, ‘you’re going to know me for a long time’ he rolled his eyes to the heavens.

Three years later, Chloe helps Lazaro in production for 2 shows, ‘Mafia Art’ and ‘Art Bitch’ in Miami’s Design District, is a contributing editor to his website and blog and in turn, Lazaro teaches Chloe the art of Printmaking and Silkscreen.

Keep posted to see how Lazaro and Chloe develop their concept “The Gift of the Moment into an art show.


My First Art Camp Experience.

Week One:

We (Artist Lazaro Amaral and Myself, Assistant Art Teacher/Writer) strive to creatively liberate our young art students and educate them using the oldest form of print used to create art work, Mono Print. Dating back to 1589, Holland this medieval machine requires you turn a large lever in a rotational motion which sends the steel roller rolling and pulls in the printing board that flattens the blanket covering the image to press the ink against a flat material and produce a unique print every time.

I stood in the print room, the vast silence almost echoed in anticipation. I was nervous. Very nervous. The room was cold, big and divided by three huge steel mono printing machines. The back painted with chalk board paint and I felt hesitation clench my being before picking up the chalk to write out the first task of the first day. My nerves roused only because this was my first experience working with children, I waited for them to arrive pouring in a mass of energy and antics.

I was thankful to have artist and friend, Lazaro Amaral to learn from and watch. His dynamic approach and energy match any child and I feel I’m in safe hands. Sure enough the first few enter wide-eyed and silenced as they look at the high topped printing tables, edges lined with printing clamps I can only imagine look daunting, least the medieval looking print machines. Three huge metal mono printing machines split the room. Each machine up to 60 years old and crafted solid steel, each look the weight of a small Dinosaur.

As you can imagine, our youngest students are most surprised, everything giant and new, even the more confident ones rushed in and silenced by the vastness of the room, looming metal and wood. All ages hushed and eager. One by one, we watch as each familiarize with tools and process to create little masterpieces. As the days pass, so the rhythm is found. The characters defined and names learned.

I introduce myself and instruct they sit in the side room altered to resemble that of a classroom as opposed to a store-room for printing equipment. Lazaro explains that before we create we must have a portfolio to keep work organized and protected. The long chalk board wall explains step by step instructions of how we are to execute our creative visions.

I watch Lazaro, an established working artist, teaching up to our ears in paint using a revolutionary machine and essential sharing art history, keeping the medium alive and in the process producing extraordinary work.


SUMMER CAMP AT THE SOUTH FLORIDA ARTS CENTER, MIAMI BEACH 2011

Our Summer Camp Vision:

To Creatively empower young minds using the oldest form of Press to create unique pieces of art. We  want to host an Exhibition, an interactive walk through of a working print room as a piece of art,  showcasing student art work from floor to ceiling. Students will share their sentiments on the  blackboard wall, paints and equipment assembled so parents and family members may experience the  artistic environment and join students in celebrating a ‘Welcome to our Art World’  Finale Exhibit. The little artesian students are between 5 and 12 years of age, passing through the print  room in four groups with no less than 3 and no more than 8 per class. Children with learning  disabilities are welcome and are both the most challenging  and rewarding to teach. Our first week focusses on Mono Printing. Mono printing translates  to ‘one of a kind’ as each print is unique. A piece of plexi glass also refered to as a  ‘tablet’ is painted. A piece of paper is then placed over it and is  aligned on the printing machine. Students turn the medieval looking  handle to roll the press and create a piece of art. Throughout the workshop key words such as, stencil, portfolio and other  technical terminologies are used frequently to  encourage students to feel and behave like ‘real’ artists.  Students keep all art work in a portfolio we aid in making  out of Newsprint paper. At the end of the two-week workshop we  show their work in a collaborative show celebrating their artistic endeavours.

Week 1 Profile Project

We move to the mono printing table where using rollers technically refered to as burnishers students  paint their tablet. First, we make four prints using the profile cut out of the head as the first  stencil to create a profile with a  colour backdrop, then the contrary. Using both parts of the cut out emphasizes how a stencil works,  students become familiar with the mono printing technique.

Students create mono prints with profile stencil to produce a little masterpiece.

Students use both parts of the stencil to create two different prints.


Images paint fresh after being pressed through the mono printing machine.


A Happy Camper shows off her Portrait Print.

 For all photos and camp details visit http://lazaroamaralart.com/Art_Camp.php


ART CAMP AT THE SOUTH FLORIDA ARTS CENTER, MIAMI BEACH

We (Artist Lazaro Amaral and Myself, Assistant Art Teacher/Writer) strive to creatively liberate our young art 
students and educate them using the oldest form of print used to create art work, Mono Print. Dating back to 
1589, Holland this medieval machine requires you turn a large lever in a rotational motion which sends the steel 
roller rolling and pulls in the printing board that flattens the blanket covering the image to press the ink against 
a flat material and produce a unique print every time. Group One arrive at 9am and are with us for 45 minutes. We have to 
work fast and keep it simple, try to develop a rhythm to work by. It's day one and I had no idea of what to expect 
from the students ranging from 5 to 12 and considering I have no experience of working with children, 
(secretly find them quite intimidating). 

Slowly the students began to arrive...
The Print Room is the coldest. Two high print tables with clamps along the four 
sides of the tall white printing tops. Three 
huge metal mono printing machines split the room. Each machine up to 60 years old and crafted solid steel, each 
look the weight of a small Dinosaur
As you can imagine, our youngest students, aged five are wide-eyed, everything giant and new. The coy 
and rambunctious alike silenced in vastness of the print room's looming metal and wood. All ages hushed and eager.

A little artist cranks the giant print press

 
One by one, we watch as each familiarize with tools and process to create little masterpieces. 
As the days pass, so the rhythm is found. The characters defined and names learned.
I watch Lazaro, an established working artist, teaching up to our ears in paint 
using a revolutionary machine and essential sharing art history, keeping the medium alive 
and in the process producing extraordinary work.

A celebration of student artwork

Gallery Day!


Fruity Poetry Art for Children

Using fruit as a muse… A little writing exercise for children to get them feeling fruity and inspired….

Fruit Exercise:

Poetry Part

Line 1: What do we have in common with fruit?

Skin? Flesh? Seeds like eyes?

Line 2: If you were a fruit what fruit would you be?

An Apple? Orange? Lemon? Grapes? Tomato?

What does your fruit smell like?

Line 3: Taste? Feel like?

Line 4: Look like if you have never seen it before?

Line 5: If you were the fruit, what would you have to say?

Example Poem:

Skin around the body

Apple fresh

Meadow sweet

Juicy and smooth

Edible ball

“Eve ate me”

Art Part

Sketch the shape of the chosen fruit and make a stencil out of it by cutting out the shape. The class at the South Florida Arts Center will teach students to stencil and print on Bristol Paper to create a fruit card. Inside the card reads a poem students have written in the first person as though they were their chosen fruit.

Example of Outcome: ‘Apple Fresh’ card.

 

 

 

Example Poem 2:

Flesh like mine when I’ve spent all day in the sun

Tomato

Smells like soup

Red, ripe and soft

A big red circle wears a little green hat and hangs from long green arms

“Everyone thinks I’m a vegetable.


Color Poetry Art for Children

Color inspired Poetry and Art for children to explore…

Color Poetry Exercise:

Name a color:

Name 3 things that are that color:

Name 3 things that sound like that color:

Name three things that taste like that color:

Name three things that feel like that color:

What can that color do?

Example Poem:

Green
is an apple, a summer meadow
canal water,
the sound of nature;
birds in the trees
insects hum
Grandma’s apple pie.
Gatorade
my favorite color jellybaby, moss growing on the side of a stone
pointy tip pentel markers,
a summer day in the country
Green is the color of Mother Nature that keeps the planet healthy.

ART PART

The South Florida Arts Center teaches students how to Mono Print. Print a block color. Write one word that you associate with that color…write it backwards in center of block. Fill in exterior white with stamps of words or phrases taken from color poem.

Outcome: A poetic mono print based on word/color association. Write full poem in creative journal.

Green Example Print

Example Print

Green Inspired Color Mono Print